Bacterial Chromatin by Remus T. Dame (auth.), Remus T. Dame, Charles J. Dorman

By Remus T. Dame (auth.), Remus T. Dame, Charles J. Dorman (eds.)

The relative simplicity of the bacterial cellphone, brief iteration occasions and good outlined and cheap culturing stipulations have considerably contributed to our knowing of many complicated organic platforms. but the workings of the bacterial genome, likely impossibly compressed inside of a tiny nucleoid, have remained elusive. How is it that micro organism may be able to package deal their genetic details in the constrained area of the nucleoid whereas whilst making it obtainable for gene expression and DNA replication?

This publication, that includes the most recent learn by way of best specialists, describes the complicated tools being utilized to the matter and indicates how their paintings is contributing to our transforming into realizing of the ways in which bacterial DNA garage, replication, recombination and gene expression are controlled and coordinated. With due attention paid to archaea and eukaryotes, the authors convey how evolution in micro organism has supplied ideas to those difficulties that variety from the very refined to the strangely simple.

This entire review of bacterial chromatin sincerely defines the elemental recommendations and is going directly to convey how cells inherit either chromosomal and extra-chromosomal genetic info at cellphone department. numerous chapters are dedicated to the principal function performed via nucleoid-associated proteins, with particular fabric on imaging the nucleoids, the physics in their constitution and segregation, and the transcriptional rules performed through nucleoid-associated proteins. No different publication at the moment to be had offers this type of whole photo of those crucial mobile processes.

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Bacterial Chromatin

The relative simplicity of the bacterial cellphone, brief iteration instances and good outlined and cheap culturing stipulations have considerably contributed to our figuring out of many complicated organic platforms. but the workings of the bacterial genome, possible impossibly compressed inside a tiny nucleoid, have remained elusive.

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Subtilis. Both chromosomes encode ParAB systems. While MreB has been implicated in the segregation of both chromosomes (Srivastava et al. 2007), segregation of chrI becomes abnormal in the absence of ParAI, in that origins are no longer tethered to the cell poles, but now segregate in a manner resembling that of origins of chrII (Fogel and Waldor 2006). ParAI forms a band that appears to consist of helical filaments from one cell pole to the other that contains the duplicated origins. ParAI also interacts with ParBI, which binds to sites close to the origin of chrI.

This model is highly attractive because it involves proteins that are present for an essential task, and does not involve any additional further specially evolved factors. 2 ParA and ParB ParA type proteins belong to a family of so-called P-loop ATPases (which include MinD proteins) and are implicated in plasmid partitioning. Low copy number plasmids contain two known types of active partitioning systems: ParA/ParB system 3 The Chromosome Segregation Machinery in Bacteria 37 (type I), and the ParR/ParM system (which is also called type II segregation system, where filaments formed by the actin-like ParM protein push plasmids towards opposite cell poles) (Chapter 4).

2003). Thus, depletion of gyrase or of Topo IV arrests chromosome segregation, due to problems during replication and disentanglement of sister chromosomes. Interestingly, a high concentration of gyrase has been observed in live B. e. close to the replication machinery), whereas Topo I accumulations frequently occur at quarter positions within cells. These differential localization patterns of topoisomerases suggest that regions with different degrees of supercoiling exist on the bacterial nucleoid (Tadesse and Graumann 2006).

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