Corn Is Our Blood: Culture and Ethnic Identity in a by Alan R. Sandstrom

By Alan R. Sandstrom

"Drawing upon 20 years of analysis between Nahua-speaking peoples of Mexico's northern Veracruz, Sandstrom presents the most exact and compelling snap shots on hand of recent Mexican Indians". -- selection.

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Set aside. In the same skillet, heat the oil over medium-high heat. Add the onion, tomatillos, garlic, and jalapeños and cook until slightly browned, 4 to 5 minutes, tossing a couple of times, but not stirring too much. Carefully place the vegetables in a blender or food processor. Then add the broth, cilantro, parsley, epazote (if using), and salt and process until puréed. Pour back into the skillet and add the ground pumpkin seed mixture. Let simmer until the flavors are well combined, about 15 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Then add the broth, cilantro, parsley, epazote (if using), and salt and process until puréed. Pour back into the skillet and add the ground pumpkin seed mixture. Let simmer until the flavors are well combined, about 15 minutes, stirring occasionally. Serve immediately. Any leftovers can be refrigerated in an airtight container for a couple of days. n ote: If you don’t have a spice grinder, a clean coffee grinder works great and a blender works fine, too. If you can’t find epazote, you can substitute the green tops of radishes or just leave them out altogether.

1 small (or ½ medium) onion, quartered 4 or 5 garlic cloves 1 bunch fresh cilantro, stems cut 1 jalapeño, stemmed and halved 1 teaspoon salt Carefully pierce the tomatillos with a fork and put them in a food processor or blender. Add the onion and garlic and process until combined. Add the cilantro, jalapeño, and salt and process until puréed. Go ahead; taste it before serving and add a bit more salt, if you think it needs it. n ote: Depending on the ripeness of your tomatillos, the salsa might be a bit tangier than you like.

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